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Did the United States pay France rent for trenches?

May 29, 2017 | Author: | Posted in Military

There is a persistent but unfounded popular belief in the United States that the American government paid the French government a rental for the use of battle trenches during the First World War. On this subject the United States War Department says: “The rumors in regard to this matter have probably originated from the fact that this Government rented ground …

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What country coined platinum money?

May 6, 2017 | Author: | Posted in Central Banking

In 1828 the Russian government began the coinage of platinum money. Platinum was produced in considerable quantities in the Ural Mountains in Russia and its general scarcity and great value were not at first appreciated. For many years the Russians considered the metal of such small value that peasants used pots and pans made of …

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Who were the Blue Devils?

May 1, 2017 | Author: | Posted in Military

The French soldiers belonging to the Chasseurs Alpins were called Blue Devils by the Germans during the First World War because of their dark blue uniforms and their dashing attacks in the fighting in the Vosges. Chasseur is derived from French chasser (“to hunt”). The Chasseurs in the French military service may consist of eight …

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Who said: “The king is dead! Long live the king!”

March 29, 2017 | Author: | Posted in History

This expression seems to be of French origin. It was used in France to announce the death of a king and the accession of his successor to the throne, signifying that the country was never without a sovereign. William Blackstone, in his Commentaries on the Laws of England (1765) expressed the same idea in, “The …

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Who, invented the postal card?

March 23, 2017 | Author: | Posted in General Knowledge

The use of postal cards was first suggested in 1865 by Heinrich von Stephan (1831-1897) when he was director of the Royal Prussian Post. Later Stephan became the first postmaster general of the German Empire and founded the International Postal Union, which became operative July 1, 1875, and which nearly all countries later joined. His …

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How did the New Orleans Mardi Gras originate?

March 22, 2017 | Author: | Posted in General Knowledge

Mardi Gras, pronounced mar-dee grah, literally means “fat Tuesday.” It is the French name of Shrove Tuesday, the day before Ash Wednesday, the beginning of Lent. Shrove is the past tense of shrive (“confess”), and Shrove Tuesday is the day on which confession or shrift was made preparatory to the forty fast days of Lent. …

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What is the capital of Switzerland?

February 28, 2017 | Author: | Posted in Geography

Bern is the political capital of the Swiss Confederation. Many people erroneously suppose that Geneva is. From the close of the Napoleonic Wars in 1815 until 1848 Bern, Zurich and Lucerne shared equally the honor of being the capital and the seat of government shifted from one to the other every two years. In 1848 …

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Who was the last British king to fight in battle?

February 22, 2017 | Author: | Posted in History

George II who was King of Great Britain from 1727 to 1760 and who regarded himself as a military genius, was the last British sovereign to take an active part in a military campaign and to participate in a battle. In 1708 at the age of twenty-five George fought at Oudenarde as Prince of Hanover. …

Who was the Laughing Murderer of Verdun?

January 14, 2017 | Author: | Posted in History

Frederick William, Crown Prince of Germany from the time of his birth in 1882 until the downfall of the Hohenzollerns in 1918, was called the “Laughing Murderer of Verdun” by his enemies during the First World War. He commanded the forces before Verdun and the name referred to the terrific losses his army sustained in …

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Why are ultraconservatives called Bourbons?

December 6, 2016 | Author: | Posted in History

The Bourbons were a royal family who ruled France from 1589 to 1848, with interruptions caused by the French Revolution and the Napoleonic regime. Members of the Bourbon family also ruled for centuries in Naples, Parma and Spain. The family was first heard of in the ninth century when its head, Baron Aimar, was lord …

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