Home » Articles tagged ‘navy

What does U.S.S. mean in ship names?

April 18, 2017 | Author: | Posted in Military

U.S.S. preceding the names of vessels are the abbreviation of United States Ship. It is frequently but erroneously stated that the second S stands for Steamship or Steamer. But these letters were used in this connection before the days of steam-propelled vessels. They are used only with the names of vessels in the United States …

Comments Off on What does U.S.S. mean in ship names? Tags: , , , ,

Why are ship compartments called “staterooms”?

March 26, 2017 | Author: | Posted in General Knowledge

According to a popular story, stateroom as applied to the compartments containing the berths on a steamship originated as follows: In 1815 Captain Henry Miller Shreve, after whom Shreveport, Louisiana, was named, made the first steamboat voyage up the Mississippi and Ohio as far as Louisiana. For many years Captain Shreve had charge of the …

Comments Off on Why are ship compartments called “staterooms”? Tags: , ,

What is a drumhead court-martial?

February 12, 2017 | Author: | Posted in Military

Any summary trial is now sometimes called a drumhead court-martial. Originally the name was given only to a summary and hasty court-martial called to try an offense committed on the battlefield or during a march. Most of the forms and ceremonies are dispensed with on such occasions; in other words, it is a kind of …

Comments Off on What is a drumhead court-martial? Tags: , , , , ,

What is meant by Plimsoll’s mark?

February 10, 2017 | Author: | Posted in General Knowledge

Plimsoll’s mark consists of a disk and letters painted in white on the outside of a British ship’s hull to indicate the limit to which the vessel may be loaded at various seasons in salt and in fresh water. It is, in other words, a “load line.” Plimsoll’s mark was named for Samuel Plimsoll (1824-1898), …

Comments Off on What is meant by Plimsoll’s mark? Tags: , , ,

How did “son of a gun” originate?

January 12, 2017 | Author: | Posted in History

This expression is used daily in conversation by thousands of persons who would never think of using it if they even so much as suspected its unsavory origin. It formerly expressed the utmost contempt for the person to whom it was applied. William Pulleyn, in his Etymological Compendium published in 1828, probably gave the correct …

Comments Off on How did “son of a gun” originate? Tags: , ,